Monthly Archives: January 2020

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To Candle or not to Candle, that’s the Question…

During the incubation process, eggs are candled to determine the number of infertile eggs and eggs with dead embryos, together indicated as ‘clears’. This can be done as early as day 5 - 6 of incubation by an individual candling light, but it is time consuming and the risk of candling errors (e.g. accidentally removal

By |2020-01-23T17:49:18+00:00January 23rd, 2020|Uncategorized|0 Comments

Adjusting Ventilation! Putting Science into Practice

Reducing ventilation at the start of incubation generally avoids the inlet of cold air. Because moisture is trapped in the closed incubator, the humidifier cold spot is also absent. Consequently closing the valves during the first days improves temperature homogeneity and heat transfer to the eggs, producing a good, uniform environment for continuing embryonic development and

By |2020-01-19T16:51:46+00:00January 19th, 2020|Knowledge center|0 Comments

Optimal Weight Loss Profiling during Incubation

Good hatchability is dependent on meeting all crucial incubation parameters. One of these important parameters is weight loss. Eggs should lose 11-13 per cent of initial weight during the first 18 days of incubation. Weight loss in hatching eggs is caused by the continuous evaporation of water from the eggs - and inseparably linked to

By |2020-01-19T16:36:03+00:00January 19th, 2020|Knowledge center|0 Comments

Managing Incubation Temperature to Combat Increased Early Mortality

As a breeder flock ages, the number of ‘clear’ (infertile) eggs increases as a result of decreased fertility and increased early mortality. Consequently, with higher numbers of clear eggs, a higher proportion of the heat produced by developing embryos in the fertile eggs is absorbed by the ‘cold’ clear eggs placed around them. Embryonic temperature

By |2020-01-19T16:16:36+00:00January 19th, 2020|Knowledge center|0 Comments

Finding Optimum Incubation Temperature

When a hatchery manager talks about incubation temperature, he or she refers to the temperature set point at the controller of the incubator. This temperature set point regulates the temperature of the air stream along the incubator’s temperature sensors. If the air temperature is too high or too low, the incubator controller adjusts the cooling

By |2020-01-19T15:40:33+00:00January 19th, 2020|Knowledge center|0 Comments

Vitamins & Their Importance

Vitamins are organic compounds sensitive to a myriad of physical and chemical reactions that affect their potency. For example, vitamin A has five double bonds highly susceptible to oxidation, whereas vitamin E is a natural antioxidant rapidly consumed without its own protection. During feed manufacturing and storage, oxidative conditions often arise that may reduce vitamin

By |2020-01-18T14:24:29+00:00January 16th, 2020|Knowledge center|0 Comments

Commercial Egg Layer & Backyard Hens Laying Failure

Egg production is a remarkable thing. A pullet (young female chicken) begins laying eggs at 18 to 20 weeks of age. She reaches peak production at about 32 weeks, with a production rate greater than 90 percent (that’s 9 eggs in 10 days for a single hen or 9 eggs from 10 birds daily). This

By |2020-01-13T17:02:52+00:00January 13th, 2020|Knowledge center|0 Comments

How Hatchery Management changes when starting Single-stage Incubation

Management in a multi-stage hatchery is based on a daily routine of setting eggs according to a strict setting schedule per setter type. The common principle for establishing a setting schedule in a multi-stage incubator is based on the need to transfer metabolic heat from more developed embryos to the less developed, heat-demanding embryos in

By |2020-01-10T03:26:41+00:00January 10th, 2020|Knowledge center|0 Comments

The Benefits of Single- Stage Incubation to Food Safety

Typically, papers on single-stage incubation focus on the benefits of all-in-all-out incubator management from the points of hatchability (number of chicks) and uniformity (chick quality). Much less is written about the positive impact of single-stage incubation management on hatchery hygiene. Yet when food safety is such a pivotal issue for the modern hatchery, from tracking

By |2020-01-10T02:41:15+00:00January 10th, 2020|Knowledge center|0 Comments